The question we are most often asked is, why does my business need a commercial jingle? The simple answer is, it will make your advertising more effective. Major corporations have spent countless millions to find out if commercial jingles work and why. Studies show that people are more prone to remember the information from commercials accompanied by singing compared to those that just include talking. The main reason commercial jingles work is that music has a powerful effect on our emotions. Mentally, we are very receptive to music, if you have ever found yourself singing the lyrics to a catchy jingle, you've experienced the "commercial jingle effect". We live in an advertising saturated society. People tend to mentally block out commercials. Commercial Jingles penetrate these mental barriers. The benefits of having a commercial jingle extend beyond conveying a message. A well-produced commercial jingle will leave a positive impression about your business. Your advertising will have a theme that you can build all facets of your business on. Big advertisers know the value of music in their TV and radio campaigns. Music influences the way people think and buy. A custom commercial jingle grabs attention, instantly identifies you and your message, makes a lasting impression and actually excites viewers and listeners about your business. Put simply: Commercial Jingles Sell! If you are worried about the cost of a commercial jingle, let me put your mind at rest. We can structure our deals to give you a discounted option on your commercial jingle. When you work with us, you can get a great custom commercial jingle at an excellent price.
When you buy a jingle, you are actually paying for the talent and facilities of several individuals. First, there are the creative and pre-production stages: the composing, scoring, and arranging of your jingle, as well as the time required to create a MIDI sequence of your jingle, and to pick samples and special effects. Then there's the time it takes to record your jingle, the studio rental fees and maintenance fees. Musicians are hired to play the parts of your jingle, and recording engineers are hired to record them. For special needs, sometimes equipment must be rented. Last but not least, there's the media, the tape, Cd's or other broadcast format used in your production.
Feel free to browse the site and email us with specific questions. Listen to our samples to get a feel for our creative personality. If you're interested, please fill up our "Inquiry Form" to describe your needs in detail. We’ll respond with an estimate. When you approve the estimate, we schedule a conference call for a kick-off discussion. Then we will send you a 'Job Order Form" or a "Music Contract" for you to sign and send back to us via email or fax. A 50% deposit against your concept demo is required at this time.
Payments can be made by company check, all major forms of credit card through PayPal. A PayPal link will be provided. A 50% deposit against your Concept Demo is required to begin all projects. Once the demo is approved 50% of the estimate balance is due to begin full production. Remaining balance is due upon delivery of full mix CD masters.
Feel free to browse the site and email us with specific questions. Listen to our samples to get a feel for our creative personality. If you’re interested, use our INQUIRY FORM to profile your project or send a detailed email to describe your needs. We’ll respond with an estimate. When you approve the estimate, we schedule a conference call for a kick-off discussion. Then we will send you a 'Job Order Form" or a "Music Contract" for you to sign and send back to us via email or fax. A 50% deposit against your concept demo is required at this time.
We certainly do! We offer male and female voices. Our vocalists and musicians are REAL top rated proffessionals! (not a software program)
Jingles have been around since the advent of commercial radio in the early 1920s, when advertisers used musical, flowery language in their ads. But it was on Christmas Eve, 1926 in Minneapolis, Minn., that the modern commercial jingle was born when an a cappella group called the Wheaties Quartet sang out in praise of a General Mills breakfast cereal. Executives at General Mills were actually about to discontinue Wheaties when they noticed a spike in its popularity in the regions where the jingle aired. So the company decided to air the jingle nationally, and sales went through the roof. Eighty years later, Wheaties is a staple in kitchens across the globe. There is some debate about this historical tidbit, though. Some point to a 1905 song called "In My Merry Oldsmobile," by Gus Edwards and Vincent Bryan, as the world's first jingle. But the song itself predates commercial radio -- Oldsmobile appropriated it for radio in the late 1920s. So, we could probably more accurately call it the world's first pop song licensed for advertising. In the early 1930s radio was enjoying a golden age, but there were strict advertising rules. Direct advertising during prime-time hours was prohibited, so advertisers started using a clever loophole -- the jingle. Jingles could mention a company or product's name without explicitly shilling that product. For example, the introduction to "The Adventures of the Jenkins Family" program began with a sing-songy "Oh, my! It's Eskimo Pie!" A good jingle can do wonders for business -- it can save a dying brand, introduce a new item to a broader audience and rejuvenate a lackluster product. The histories of the jingle and commercial radio are inextricably entwined. Prior to the popularization of radio, products were sold on a one-on-one basis (at the store, or by a traveling salesman), and advertisements from those days reflect that. They are very direct, matter-of-factly describing the benefits of their product over their competitor's. But as the radio audience grew, advertisers had to convince the public of the superiority of a product they couldn't see -- for this purpose, jingles were ideJingles are written to be as easy to remember as nursery rhymes. The shorter the better, the more repetition the better, the more rhymes the better. If you're being indecisive in the deodorant aisle and you suddenly hear a voice in your head singing "by … Mennen," you might drop a Speed Stick (manufactured by Mennen) into your basket without a second thought. Jingles are designed to infiltrate your memory and stay there for years, sometimes popping up from out of nowhere. You probably fondly remember all of the words to the Oscar Mayer B-O-L-O-G-N-A song, the "plop plop fizz fizz" chorus of the Alka-Seltzer jingle, and countless other melodies from your childhood. Psychologists and neurologists who study the effects of music on the brain have found that music with a strong emotional connection to the listener is difficult to forget. It was this discovery that led marketers to license pop songs for advertising instead of commissioning original jingles. It turns out that some pop songs contain earworms: pleasantly melodic, easy-to-remember "hooks" that have the attributes of a typical jingle. Earworms, also known by their German name, "ohrwurm," are those tiny, 15- to 30-second pieces of music that you can't get out of your head no matter how hard you try (the phenomenon is also called Song Stuck Syndrome, repetuneitis, the Jukebox Virus and melodymania). The word "earworm" was popularized by James Kellaris, a marketing professor at the University of Cincinnati, who has done a great deal (for better or worse) to bring this phenomenon to the forefront of the study of advertising techniques. We don't know much about what causes earworms, but it could be the repeating of the neural circuits that represent the melody in our brains. It might also have to do with some of the findings of researchers Alan Baddely and Graham Hitch, and the model of working memory, the part of the brain that practices and repeats verbal information [source: Models of Working Memory]. In 1974 Baddely and Hitch discovered what they called the phonological loop, which is composed of the phonological store (your "inner ear," which remembers sounds in chronological order) and the articulatory rehearsal system (your "inner voice," which repeats these sounds in order to remember them). This area of the brain is vital in early childhood for developing vocabulary and in adulthood for learning new languages. Researchers have noted that the shorter and simpler the melody, the more likely it is to get stuck in your head -- this is why some of the most common earworms are jingles and the choruses of pop songs.
Jingles are written to be as easy to remember as nursery rhymes. The shorter the better, the more repetition the better, the more rhymes the better. If you're being indecisive in the deodorant aisle and you suddenly hear a voice in your head singing "by … Mennen," you might drop a Speed Stick (manufactured by Mennen) into your basket without a second thought. Jingles are designed to infiltrate your memory and stay there for years, sometimes popping up from out of nowhere. You probably fondly remember all of the words to the Oscar Mayer B-O-L-O-G-N-A song, the "plop plop fizz fizz" chorus of the Alka-Seltzer jingle, and countless other melodies from your childhood. Psychologists and neurologists who study the effects of music on the brain have found that music with a strong emotional connection to the listener is difficult to forget. It was this discovery that led marketers to license pop songs for advertising instead of commissioning original jingles. It turns out that some pop songs contain earworms: pleasantly melodic, easy-to-remember "hooks" that have the attributes of a typical jingle. Earworms, also known by their German name, "ohrwurm," are those tiny, 15- to 30-second pieces of music that you can't get out of your head no matter how hard you try (the phenomenon is also called Song Stuck Syndrome, repetuneitis, the Jukebox Virus and melodymania). The word "earworm" was popularized by James Kellaris, a marketing professor at the University of Cincinnati, who has done a great deal (for better or worse) to bring this phenomenon to the forefront of the study of advertising techniques. We don't know much about what causes earworms, but it could be the repeating of the neural circuits that represent the melody in our brains. It might also have to do with some of the findings of researchers Alan Baddely and Graham Hitch, and the model of working memory, the part of the brain that practices and repeats verbal information [source: Models of Working Memory]. In 1974 Baddely and Hitch discovered what they called the phonological loop, which is composed of the phonological store (your "inner ear," which remembers sounds in chronological order) and the articulatory rehearsal system (your "inner voice," which repeats these sounds in order to remember them). This area of the brain is vital in early childhood for developing vocabulary and in adulthood for learning new languages. Researchers have noted that the shorter and simpler the melody, the more likely it is to get stuck in your head -- this is why some of the most common earworms are jingles and the choruses of pop songs.
1. Research shows that the memory retention of a commercial jingle is 10 times faster than that of an all-talking ad. 2. People turn on the radio to listen to music, that's why commercial jingles fit in so well, they are music. 3. Even if a listener doesn't like a particular tune doesn't mean that it won't dive into their brain and make them whistle or hum it all day long. 4. We have no defense mechanism against music. 5. Commercial Jingles will last for years in people's minds. 6. A commercial jingle is like your letterhead or sign. It's a musical logo. 7. If you have a commercial jingle and your competition doesn't your ahead. 8. If your competition has a commercial jingle and you don't then your behind.